brown patches of grass

How to Repair Bare Patches in Your Lawn

Now that the growing season is fully under way and dormant yards have turned green, any dead patches or bare spots will be obvious. If you have problem areas that require attention this spring, this guide will lead you step by step through using sod to restore your lawn to its former green glory. 

dog sitting of green grass Identify the Culprit

Before you get started, it’s important to address the underlying problem so it doesn’t happen again. Lawn pests, disease, pet urine and abuse can all kill grass in an otherwise healthy lawn. Contact a turfgrass professional if you have trouble identifying or treating the issue.

ID Your Grass

Before you buy sod, you need to know what variety of grass is already in your lawn so the patch will match seamlessly. Again, if you’re not sure, contact a turfgrass professional for help.

Cut a Patch

For a small repair, use a garden knife or sharp spade to cut the sod. The patch should slightly overlap the healthy grass. For larger areas, lay out sod pieces and fit to slightly overlap the damage.

Clear the Area

Use the patch as a template and remove any grass, weeds or other plant material, including the roots, where the new sod will lay. Removing a narrow margin of healthy grass around the spot will help ensure that the affected material is completely gone. A spade will work to clear a small spot, but you’ll need a shovel for larger areas.

Water the Area

Thoroughly soak the soil to dilute or remove any residual treatments, chemicals or other substances.

Prepare the Soil

Loosen the soil down three to four inches, using a spade, rake, shovel, or tiller depending on the size of the area.

Lay the Patch

The new sod should fit snugly beside the healthy grass without overlapping or gapping. A snug fit will help the new grass get established and discourage weeds. Gently tamp the patch with the back of a garden rake to make sure the new sod gets good contact with the soil.

Water the Patch

Keep the area moist but not soggy with light watering twice a day. Ideally the top three to four inches of soil will remain moist—not soaked—for two weeks.

If you need fresh sod to patch your lawn or if you have questions about damage to your grass, contact our Certified Turfgrass Professionals at 770-832-8608 or info@NGTurf.com.